Socrates (470-399 B.C.)

  • Do not take thought for your persons or your properties, but first and chiefly to care about the greatest improvement of the soul. I tell you that the virtue is not given by money, but that from vitue come money and every other good of man, public as well as private… The difficulty, my friends, is not in avoiding death, but in avoiding unrighteousness; for that runs faster than death.
  • By all means marry. If you get a good wife you will become happy, and if you get a bad one you will become a philosopher
  • Let him who would move the world first move himself.
  • If all our misfortunes were laid in one common heap whence everyone must take an equal portion, most people would be contented to take their own and depart.
  • May the outward and inward man be at one.
  • Be of good cheer about death and know this as a truth–that no evil can happen to a good man, either in life or after death.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: